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Make Starting School Easy With Noddy!

Exclusive top tips for starting school on www.noddy.com


Research reveals parents prioritise their children’s happiness and respect for others over everything else

Starting school or pre-school can be a scary time for both children and parents. To make things easier, Noddy and his Toyland friends have teamed up with child education expert, Jacqueline Harding, to produce a list of their top tips on www.noddy.com to ensure things run smoothly.

 

More than 1,700 parents from across the country have also revealed their hopes and aspirations for their children during the first year of school or pre-school on Noddy.com.  

 

Respect emerged highest on the agenda, with the majority of parents (34%) saying the most important step to prepare children for school was to teach them to respect others.  Following closely behind was teaching them to make friends with 23% of parents choosing this as a required skill. 

 

At the other end of the scale, just 10% of parents thought toilet training their children was important and only 6% said they would be teaching their children to write their own name.  

Starting school or pre-school can be a scary time for both children and parents. To make things easier, Noddy and his Toyland friends have teamed up with child education expert, Jacqueline Harding, to produce a list of their top tips on www.noddy.com to ensure things run smoothly.

Noddy and Friends

More than 1,700 parents from across the country have also revealed their hopes and aspirations for their children during the first year of school or pre-school on Noddy.com.  

 

Respect emerged highest on the agenda, with the majority of parents (34%) saying the most important step to prepare children for school was to teach them to respect others.  Following closely behind was teaching them to make friends with 23% of parents choosing this as a required skill. 

 

At the other end of the scale, just 10% of parents thought toilet training their children was important and only 6% said they would be teaching their children to write their own name.  

 

Parents were also asked what they most want their children to gain from their first year of school.  Happiness emerged as parents’ greatest wish with 45% saying they most wanted their children to be happy, settle in, and have fun during their first year at school.  This compares with 17% of parents, who felt that their child’s academic achievements were more important.

 

‘Learning discipline’ was rated lowest, with just 5% of parents considering this to be the most important thing for their child to gain in their first year.

 

The research also showed that parents in Wales are more likely to teach their children respect than anywhere else in the country (62%) but also more likely to prepare their children for pre-school with toilet training (25%).  Meanwhile, the East of England is the region most likely to want their children to be top of class with 40% of parents thinking this, and parents in the North East of England are more likely than anywhere else to want their children to be happy and have fun, with 52% saying this is their priority.

 

Jacqueline Harding, Noddy’s child education expert, said: “It is really encouraging to see that the majority of parents want their children to be respectful of others. Learning respect is so important in life and is something that will stay with children all their lives. It is also a big challenge faced by teachers and the government, and it is great to have parents supporting this from the earliest stages.

 “To help make sure your child’s first experience of school or pre-school is a happy one, we’ve put together a selection of last minute tips to get any young learner off to a flying start.

 

  1. Play ‘Simon Says’ to help your child learn how to follow instructions.

 

  1. Show your child 5 objects on a tray - then cover them up and secretly remove one. Play a game with your child trying to identify the missing object as this will help to improve memory skills.

 

  1. Read story books to your child and, just before the end, ask them what they think might happen (this is great for encouraging prediction skills).

 

  1. Show your child that you are setting a timer to tell you and them that it is time to stop a play activity – great for helping your child understand that sometimes enjoyable activities have to be interrupted (schools are run on routine!).

 

  1. Try using ‘descriptive praise’ (telling your child why what they are doing is worthy of praise) – great for helping them to sort out right from wrong.

 

  1. Set a regular bedtime so that your child has sufficient sleep – this is known to boost memory power.

 

  1. Invite potential friends around to play who will be starting school at the same time – it’s so good to see a familiar face when starting somewhere new – as we all know!

 

  1. Look at a book or video together about starting school – this might just be the chance your child needs to think it all through and ask you questions.

 

  1. Build those communication skills by playing a game of ‘pass the story’ where someone starts by making up a story and then passes it to the next person to make up and tell the next bit… and so on (two or more can play).

 

  1. Try offering your child brain boosting foods such as those high in omega 3 which are mainly found in fish, nuts and seeds to get those brain cells firing for the big day.

 

Remember, visit www.Noddy.com for more useful advice on starting school!
your child and noddy

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